stef. 28. nyc. mcu (bucky! steve! metal arms!) and film. I like weird movies, comic books filled with innuendo, and animal crackers.

sometimes i make art/manips. other times i wish for 80's stevebucky AUs. it's a problem.

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illustratedkate:

Continuation of my Parks and Recreation AU (1 of 3) - credit to my twitter pals who gave me some of the cutest ideas!

memoryrecovery:

Memory ≠ Recovery

Best friends since childhood, Bucky Barnes and Steven Rogers where inseparable on both schoolyard and battlefield. Barnes is the only Howling Commando to give his life in service of his country.

memoryrecovery:

Memory ≠ Recovery

Best friends since childhood, Bucky Barnes and Steven Rogers where inseparable on both schoolyard and battlefield. Barnes is the only Howling Commando to give his life in service of his country.
dorianthewellendowed:

cesperanza:

prtypooper:

hahahaha this is amazing. 
Captain Small Ass and Falcon Big Butt in all their glory.

LOLOL.  I’m waiting for the photoshop in 5….4….3….

lord almighty, the greatest butt in the mcu

dorianthewellendowed:

cesperanza:

prtypooper:

hahahaha this is amazing. 

Captain Small Ass and Falcon Big Butt in all their glory.

LOLOL.  I’m waiting for the photoshop in 5….4….3….

lord almighty, the greatest butt in the mcu

aconissa:

Mutuals! I reminder that I will happily give you my:

  • snapchat
  • imessage
  • skype
  • phone number
  • facebook

just drop me a message

americachavez:

image

the most beautiful sentence in all of history

Hi all my Korean fans, Chris Evans here. I played Curtis in Snowpiercer [x]

sadboosexual:

theyuniversity:

It’s good to know that we weren’t the only ones driven crazy by people who “axe” questions.

Okay, see, we talked about this linguisitic phenomenon in my grammar class. I don’t remember what it’s called, but it happens with other words, too - my professor used an example of “uncomfortable.” When you say it out loud, most likely, it sounds more like “un-comf-ter-ble,” thus mixing up the position of the r and the t, like how the k and the s are mixed in this speech pattern. However, not many people are out here acting high and mighty because someone said “uncomfterble” like they are with “ax,” and that has absolutely everything to do with academic biases - because “ax” is associated mostly with Black people (and occasionally lower-class whites), it’s viewed as “improper” speech, whereas most people, even middle & upper class white people who are thought to speak the most ~proper~ version of English, say “uncomfterble.”
And a quick Google search yields that even Chaucer used “axe” to mean “ask” within his writing. (Source) (Source)
tl;dr actually caring about whether someone says “ask” ~”correctly”~~ is rooted in racist & classist biases of language so, consider, not. 

sadboosexual:

theyuniversity:

It’s good to know that we weren’t the only ones driven crazy by people who “axe” questions.

Okay, see, we talked about this linguisitic phenomenon in my grammar class. I don’t remember what it’s called, but it happens with other words, too - my professor used an example of “uncomfortable.” When you say it out loud, most likely, it sounds more like “un-comf-ter-ble,” thus mixing up the position of the r and the t, like how the k and the s are mixed in this speech pattern. However, not many people are out here acting high and mighty because someone said “uncomfterble” like they are with “ax,” and that has absolutely everything to do with academic biases - because “ax” is associated mostly with Black people (and occasionally lower-class whites), it’s viewed as “improper” speech, whereas most people, even middle & upper class white people who are thought to speak the most ~proper~ version of English, say “uncomfterble.”

And a quick Google search yields that even Chaucer used “axe” to mean “ask” within his writing. (Source) (Source)

tl;dr actually caring about whether someone says “ask” ~”correctly”~~ is rooted in racist & classist biases of language so, consider, not.